The Autism Toolbox: Staying Safe

This "Toolbox" brings together advice, local support, services, activities and resources relating to autism. The name toolbox has been chosen to reflect that anyone, with or without an autism diagnosis, parents and professionals can make use of this information which covers various topics. This section is about safety.

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In this section (Jump to)

Road Safety

Online Safety for Autistic People 

Homelessness Toolkit

Autism Support Dogs 


Road Safety

Road safety and awareness of danger for people on the autism spectrum

This article by the National Autistic Society (NAS) provides practical steps you can take to keep an autistic person who lacks an appropriate sense of danger safe and help them develop awareness skills themselves.

  

Online Safety for Autistic People 

Learning Disabilities, Autism and Internet Safety

This guide offers suggestions to help parents limit the risk of their child having negative experiences online and understand what action can be taken if they do. Produce by Cerebra, Mencap, and Ambitious About Autism.

Staying Safe Online (NAS)

On this page you will find our various policies and procedures on online safety plus advice and resources to help you and your child navigate the virtual world safely.

How to stay safe online (Ambitious about Autism)

A guide by Ambitious about Autism's myVoice volunteers to help other young people with autism: know what possible risks to look out for, identify what things could be potentially unsafe, understand how to deal with any problems online.

 

Homelessness 

Autism Homelessness Toolkit

Toolkit exploring autism and its links with homelessness. Feature resources and support services. Supported by City of Westminster, homeless link, resources for autism, St Mungo's and The National Autistic Society.

  

Autism Support Dogs 

There are a few charities/organisation out there that train and provide support dogs to those with autism. Some of these organisations include:

Dogs for Good

An innovative charity, exploring ways dogs can help people overcome specific challenges and enrich and improve lives and communities.

Support Dogs

A registered national charity dedicated to increasing independence and quality of life for people with various medical conditions. We provide, train and support specialist assistance dogs to achieve this. They specialise in three specific programmes, one of which is Autism assistance dogs for children aged three to ten years with autism. The dogs are trained to provide safety for the child and reduce stress in social environments.