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Accessibility

Accessibility Statement for the Buckinghamshire Family Information Service Website

This website is run by the Buckinghamshire Family Information Service through our third party supplier Open Objects (part of the Idox Group.)

We want as many people as possible to be able to use this website. For example, that means you should be able to:

  • change colours, contrast levels and fonts

  • zoom in up to 300% without the text spilling off the screen

  • navigate most of the website using just a keyboard

  • navigate most of the website using speech recognition software

  • listen to most of the website using a screen reader (including the most recent versions of JAWS, NVDA and VoiceOver)

AbilityNet has advice on making your device easier to use if you have a disability.

Text Size and Colour Preferences

Some people find certain text and background colours difficult to read, while others prefer to have a specific colour such as white text on a black background. You can change the text and background colour using the accessibility controls below. Once you have chosen your text size and colour preferences below and clicked "Apply settings", you can then use the back arrow in your browser to return a previous page and your new settings will remain. If you need to change these settings again, a link to this accessibility page can always be found at the bottom of this website.

Choose a theme:

We have added the world-leading digital inclusion software, Browsealoud, to our website - making our content more accessible with reading and translation support.

How to use Browsealoud

Click on the Browsealoud launch pad that appears in the corner of your screen to launch the support toolbar. It may appear in different corners of your screen depending on whether you are using a computer, phone or tablet.  Then simply click on any text to hear it read out loud.

  

How does Browsealoud help?

Browsealoud offers a host of reading and translation support - helping you to access and understand our website better.  

  • text-to-speech: click on or select any text to hear it read aloud

  • translation: written and spoken translations in multiple languages - English Language abbreviations

  • text magnification: enlarges text and reads it out loud

  • mp3 generation: converts selected text into an MP3 audio file

  • screen mask: blocks distractions on screen with a tinted mask

  • web page simplifier: removes clutter from the screen, displaying only the main text

  • settings: customise options to suit individual needs or preferences

All the features are accessed from an easy-to-use, floating toolbar - allowing you to drag and drop it anywhere on screen.  


Watch the Browsealoud Features video to see Browsealoud in action.

We’re always looking to improve the accessibility of this website. If you find any problems that aren’t listed on this page or think we’re not meeting the requirements of the accessibility regulations, contact: 

The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) is responsible for enforcing the accessibility regulations. If you’re not happy with how we respond to your complaint, contact the Equality Advisory and Support Service (EASS).

There are several ways to contact us:

  • Email familyinfo@buckscc.gov.uk for all information, advice and support assistance

  • Email fisdigital@buckscc.gov.uk for all questions or queries concerning our website or social media

  • Social platforms Facebook or Twitter 

  • Telephone on 01296 382246

  • If you would prefer to visit us in person please contact us by one of the above channels, let us know if you require any assistance or specific requirements when you visit and we will be happy to organise a meeting with you.

The Buckinghamshire Family Information Service is committed to making its website accessible, in accordance with the Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018.

This website is partially compliant with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines version 2.1 AA standard, due to the non-compliances listed below. 

We continually monitor compliance through the web governance software application Site Improve.

There are a number of accessibility features which we are not able to resolve due to the technical limitations with our website developer Open Objects who are part of the Idox Group.

Non Compliance with Accessibility Regulations

The content listed below is non-accessible as either Open Objects are unable to fix or the cost of them doing so is outside of our budget means.  We will review and resolve these in the future, for example when supplier contracts are up for renewal.

Level A | Error
  • On most pages the ID used for an element on the page is also used for another element on the page. This doesn’t meet WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.3.1 (Info and Relationships).

  • On most pages HTML is used to format content. Presentational attributes such as 'border', 'align', or 'bgcolor' are used instead of CSS. This doesn’t meet WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.3.1 (Info and Relationships).

  • On some pages the same link text is used for links going to different destinations, so people might not know the difference. This doesn’t meet WCAG 2.1 success criterion 2.4.4 (Link Purpose, In Context).

  • On some pages the iFrame has no 'title' attribute or the 'title' attribute is empty. This doesn’t meet WCAG 2.1 success criterion 4.1.2 (Name, Role, Value).

  • On some pages the element does not follow the specification in regards to which states and properties should be present for this type of element. This doesn’t meet WCAG 2.1 success criterion 4.1.2 (Name, Role, Value).

  • On the home page, there is a WAI-ARIA ‘aria-labelledby’ attribute has a reference to an ID that does not exist or an ID that is not unique. This doesn’t meet WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.1.1 (Non-text Content).

  • On many pages the ID used for an element on the page is also used for another element on the page. This doesn’t meet WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.3.1 (Info and Relationships).

  • The search results page contains a form but there is no submit button.  This doesn’t meet WCAG 2.1 success criterion 3.2.2 (On input).

Level A | Warning
  • HTML5 or WAI-ARIA landmarks are used on the page, but not all content is included.  This doesn’t meet WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.3.1 (Info and Relationships).

  • The italics-tag 'i' is used to highlight text.  This doesn’t meet WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.3.1 (Info and Relationships).

  • Pages contain two or more HTML5 or WAI-ARIA landmarks of the same type that has not been named. Users might not know the difference if it's not somehow explained. .  This doesn’t meet WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.3.1 (Info and Relationships).

  • A WAI-ARIA attribute that has the exact same features as the HTML element it has been applied to has been used. The WAI-ARIA attribute is redundant since is doesn't provide the user with any additional information.  This doesn’t meet WCAG 2.1 success criterion 4.1.2 (Name, Role, Value).

  • On one page, create your account, there is no means of bypassing blocks of content that are repeated on multiple web pages must be provided. This doesn’t meet WCAG 2.1 success criterion 2.4.1 (Bypass Blocks).

Level AA | Error
  • The colour of the text and the colour of the background are not in sufficient contrast to each other. This doesn’t meet WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.4.3 Contrast (Minimum). This is service design branding that we have to comply to and affects 1800 pages.

  • Reporting a comment form. The user interface elements, that can receive keyboard focus, are not highlighted on focus.  This doesn’t meet WCAG 2.1 success criterion 2.4.7 (Focus Visible).

Level AAA | Error
  • The colour of the text and the colour of the background are not in sufficient contrast to each other. This doesn’t meet WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.4.6 Contrast (Enhanced). This is service design branding that we have to comply to and affects 1800 pages.

  • On some pages the same link text is used for links going to different destinations, so people might not know the difference. This doesn’t meet WCAG 2.1 success criterion 2.4.9 Link Purpose (Link Only). 


Images and alternative text (alt)

Some images don’t have a text alternative, so the information in them isn’t available to people using a screen reader. This doesn’t meet WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.1.1 (non-text content).

We plan to add text alternatives for all images by September 2020. When we publish new content we’ll make sure our use of images meets accessibility standards.

We believe that the cost required to fix some of the issues now would be a disproportionate burden within the meaning of the accessibility regulations. We will make another assessment in the future, for example when supplier contracts are up for renewal.

There are some issues we don't believe need to be fixed now. For example something that may technically be considered an accessibility issue, but is actually unlikely to make it difficult for someone to use the website. 

PDFs and other documents

Many of our older PDFs and Word documents don’t meet accessibility standards - for example, they may not be structured so they’re accessible to a screen reader. This doesn’t meet WCAG 2.1 success criterion 4.1.2 (name, role value).

Some of our PDFs and Word documents are essential to providing our services. For example, we have PDFs with information on how users can access our services, and forms published as Word documents. By September 2020, we will aim to either fix these or replace them with accessible HTML pages.

The accessibility regulations don’t require us to fix PDFs or other documents published before 23 September 2018 if they’re not essential to providing our services.

Any new PDFs or Word documents we publish should meet accessibility standards.

Live Videos

Live video streams don’t have captions. This doesn’t meet WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.2.4 (captions - live). 

We don’t plan to add captions to live video streams because live video is exempt from meeting the accessibility regulations.

This website was last tested in August 2019. The test was carried out by the Buckinghamshire Family Information Service Digital Team within Buckinghamshire County Council.

We used a combination of methods to test the accessibility of our website:

  • automated software (Siteimprove) to crawl and find accessibility issues on our website

  • manual sampling and testing of pages to find issues that software might miss

We tested our main website platform, available at www.bucksfamilyinfo.org

Speaking websites

There are a number of programmes available that enable your computer to talk to you.

Microsoft Windows comes with a basic screen reader called Narrator, which reads text on the screen aloud and describes some events (such as an error message appearing) that happen while you’re using the computer. You can find more information on how to use Narrator on the Microsoft website

There are also a number of Screen Reader programmes with more features, such as being able to read whole documents. Some of the most popular include:

For Mac users, the Mac operating system also has a built in speech to text function, which you can access by going to ‘System Preferences’ and selecting ‘Universal Access’.

Magnifying your screen

All recent versions of Microsoft Windows include magnification software. This allows you to greatly increase text size, although this will be restricted to only a small proportion of the screen. To use Windows magnifier, click on ‘Start’ then select ‘Programmes’ followed by ‘Accessories’ and ‘Magnifier’. You can then select the amount of magnification you want from the dialog box that will appear on screen.

For Mac users, you can select the screen magnifier option by going to ‘System Preferences’ and selecting ‘Universal Access’.

Slowing down your mouse speed

Some people find that it is easier to use a mouse at a slower speed. In Microsoft Windows, you can change this setting in the same way as you change the size of your mouse pointer. From the ‘Mouse Pointer Options’ menu just slide the ‘Select a pointer speed’ bar to slow or speed up the mouse.

For Mac users, from the ‘Mouse and Track pad’ menu you can use the ‘Tracking Speed’ slider bar to change the mouse speed.

Using your keyboard to move around a website

For people who can’t use a mouse or track pad, it is possible to navigate around a computer screen using different keystrokes on the keyboard.

There is further information on keyboard shortcuts on the Microsoft Windows website. You can also find information on using the keyboard with different web browsers and other programmes in this RNIB guide

More information for access on different devices

For more detailed guidance on how to increase accessibility and change how your device or web browser works, we recommend the following websites:

This statement was prepared on 23 August 2019 and last updated on 17 October 2019.

You can download a copy of this statement in PDF/A format.